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Saturday Morning Drop in Art – New to the studio!

 

Thanks to our new studio being so easily accessible for every one we’ve decided to open up on Saturday mornings so you can come and have a sticky beak! Our Saturday morning sessions are a drop in style class with no actual direction – so your mini-artist can let their imagination fly and create whatever project their creative little heart desires.

Each day we will have a different medium available for your mini-artist to play with – it may be acrylic paints, watercolour paints, paint markers, collage materials, glass/ceramic painting or craft materials. In addition there will always be sketching materials, coloured pencils and access to all our reference materials available every morning.

What’s super cool about this class is that no one needs to follow set orders. If your mini-artist wants to create a burger dancing in a pink tutu wearing a mohawk they can (yes that’s been done before in our class while the rest of us were painting the sea), if they want to create themselves a vision board, or a card for Nanna, or just paint their own hands and smear it all over a canvas… they can!

Sessions will be $10 for an hour, and include a 30×40 canvas, larger canvasses are available for a few extra dollars. If you’d like something a little more structured you can purchase an art pack from our little front store and one of our artists can help your child with the project while you have a coffee next door!

The amazing Bella, will be available every Saturday for any questions or help your mini-artist needs with their creations, and I will be there personally for many of the sessions as well!

For those who already know Bella, you’ll know she is an amazing cartoonist and the kids LOVE her. For those who haven’t met Bella yet, come along one Saturday morning and get to know her!

Can’t wait to see what our mini-artists create once they are given full access to their imagination!!!

 


EVERY SATURDAY

10AM-1PM

DROP IN TO

30 CURRUMBIN CREEK ROAD, CURRUMBIN

EVERY  Save

Street Art, Homeschool and Term 2 at Artlis Studios!

This set of school holidays has been completely amazing! Our new street artist Gilly has joined the Artlis Team and spent an entire day running workshops with our mini-artists helping them develop their individual styles with a graffiti flair!

Gilly will be running workshops throughout the term on Sundays from 9.30-11.30, and still has some spaces left! Workshops will be run over the course of three weekend, two hours each costing a total of $95 for the set. Mini-artists will be experimenting with posca markers, sharpies and paint to create vinyl stickers and canvasses using Gilly’s signature graffiti layering techniques!

We still have spaces available in our homeschool sessions on Wednesdays at 1.15. Our homeschool term runs for 8 weeks and is $120 for the term. Small classes means our teacher, Sacha can give your mini-artist lots of attention.

Sacha Beverley, Homeschool and afterschool classes

 

MORE EXCITING NEWS!!! Our very own Sacha Beverley is getting ready for her solo exhibition with 19Karen Gallery. Check out more of her work and the exhibition information here.  This is one super talented lady and we feel so lucky to have her be part of the Artlis Team 🙂 Sacha teaches afterschool with Artlis Mondays and Wednesdays (5-12 years) and also runs her own abstract classes for 12-16 year olds on Saturday mornings.

 

 

 

Keep an eye out for Artlis Studios online shop! We will be showcasing work from our mini-artists and our teachers for sale, plus art packs to help you make our most popular workshop projects in your own home!

Enjoy the rest of the school break and be careful on the roads over the Easter long weekend!! I an’t wait to see you all back in the studio in term 2.

Lis xo

 

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Starting term 4.

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This week will mark the 2 YEAR ANNIVERSARY of my studio opening it’s doors on a mission to nurture the oddball creative genius that lurks inside so many of us. From picnics under tables, to arty boot camp, from inventing new ways to use watercolours, to developing whole new worlds inside our minds, the mini-artists who have graced the studio with their imaginations so far have made my world shine!

Each mini-artist has a unique way of looking at life and art. I’ve watched so many mini-artists developing their own style over the last couple of years, taking the skills they learn in class and creating masterpieces that rival anything they have ever created before.

This term we will be concentrating on our relationships with others and our own selves. We will be exploring how to hold our own whilst still being a valuable collaborator on team project. Our team work project will involve all students, across every class, contributing their own little piece of individuality to a tiny clay world, a world where their quirkiness will be celebrated and their personal style loved as an important part of something bigger  – a mash up of styles from all skill levels, and many different pools of imagination.

I’m trying my best to imagine what this world will look like… but your mini-artists surprise me so often I can’t even begin to guess what they will create.

Amongst all of this we will be playing with clay, acrylics, watercolours, pencils, paper and Christmas ideas. I’ll introduce the mini-artists to the odd artform of quilling, and experiment with many of the same media that mini-artists are already becoming familiar with in the studio.

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So here’s to a whole new term of unicorns, making friends with monsters, working together and sending the occasional child home blue (or rainbow coloured, or painted like a lizard), here’s to opening the studio to new ideas, and turning every task into an opportunity to think outside the box or paint outside the lines.

I can’t wait!

Painting without paper.

Students experimenting with painting on things other than paper in our Wednesday Expression Session.

Creative Education – How art affects your child’s learning?

This report shows research that details how being exposed to the arts can affect your child in regards to learning, critical thinking and social engagement.

When I stumbled across this report I was researching creative education in children and how and encouraging creativity in our youngsters can affect their life in other areas. So I had to share it.

Although this research was done in America, it can really adapt itself to any country. Art is beautiful in any language and the underlying concept of the arts helping to increase capability in so many other areas is universal.studio-homeschool

This is a very easy to read 5 page report which perhaps your kids will even understand if they care to read – although most kids I know are willing to create, just for the fun of creating.

You can read the report here and find out for yourself!!

Happy reading xx

King Triton’s Throne – Water and Wax Sculptures

I love this project as it’s a cross between science and art – and it fit in well with the Surrealism projects we had been doing this term. This is a version of automatic art – where the artist is not completely in control of the media used or the final result.

A forewarning – this project DOES involve hot wax, so there are some age groups that it won’t be suitable for. I would recommend it for 6 years and up. They are also a very fragile sculpture, so make sure you have something suitable for your students to carry them home in!

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Here’s what you will need:

  1. About 3-4 tealights worth of wax for each sculpture – you can use old burned out candles, or new ones, or even just plain candle wax (if you can get it.)
  2. Foil Pie tins (I got 50 for $2 at the dollar shop)
  3. A deep bucket of icy water (I put 5kg ice into a bucket that was about 50cm deep)
  4. A jam jar or other glass jar (I used four in a one saucepan to melt the wax faster)
  5. A saucepan with about 4cm of water in it.
  6. A stove top.

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Here’s how we did it:

Set the jam jars in the saucepan with water, and allow to boil until the wax melts. By setting it up like this (like a double boiler) you wont burn the wax, you reduce fire hazards and you save your saucepan from needing to be thrown out.

We tried candle wax and crayon wax – the crayon wax did not work well, it’s was too soft and didn’t hold the sculpture structure very well.

Once the wax is completely melted, use oven mitts to carry it outside to your bucket of iced water.

Let the child hold the pie dish over the water while an adult pours in wax to about half way full.

Immediately – but gently – plunge the pie dish and melted wax into the water. They might take a few sculptures to get this technique right, but I found if you make them count to five as they plunge the dish in, they get at about the right speed. The wax tries to float, but is solidified so quickly it cannot escape the pie dish and ends up in a spiky “King Triton’s Throne” shape.

When they get to the bottom, get them to hold the dish on the bottom for about 5 seconds to solidify the wax properly, then they can pull their sculpture out and empty off the water.

We tried to make some with less wax, and some with more wax – we found the results were much more striking for the ones with more wax, but that the wax was also more likely to touch the kids hands as it escapes the dish.

NOTES:
This project uses hot wax – I put some plastic gloves on my kids so if the wax did touch their hands underwater it wouldn’t stick to their skin. The icy water is cold enough that it protects them from the heat, but I didn’t want to damage their skin by trying to pick off wax!

Some pie dishes have little holes in the bottom – get the students to put some little bits of sticky tape over their holes first so the wax doesn’t just drip out.

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